Category Archives: Advocacy

April A to Z Blogging Challenge: Civil Rights

C is for Civil Rights on April A to Z Blogging Challenge

 

The disability community at large has been fighting for civil rights for decades.

 

 

“I can’t even get to the back of the bus.” ADAPT activists protesting for accessible transportation, Philadelphia, 1990. [Smithsonian National Museum of American History]
“I can’t even get to the back of the bus.” ADAPT activists protesting for accessible transportation, Philadelphia, 1990. [Smithsonian National Museum of American History]
In order to be good advocates today, it’s important to appreciate the hard work that has been done before. Continue reading April A to Z Blogging Challenge: Civil Rights

April A to Z blogging Challenge: What Is Advocacy?

A is for Advocacy on The Road We've Shared  A to Z Blogging Challenge

Merriam-Webster defines advocacy as:

the act or process of supporting a cause or proposal.

Advocacy is something that we, as parents of individuals with Down syndrome, are introduced to as soon as our children are born. What I’ve learned over thirty-some years is that no parent describes advocacy exactly the same way.

Continue reading April A to Z blogging Challenge: What Is Advocacy?

Missouri Families and Lawmakers Fight to Save Sheltered Workshops

M is for Missouri on the #AtoZChallenge by The Road We've Shared

A new Missouri state resolution reaffirms the state’s support of sheltered workshops after disabled people and their families band together to “protect the right to choose sheltered employment as a valuable work choice.”

Continue reading Missouri Families and Lawmakers Fight to Save Sheltered Workshops

What would you talk to your Congressional leaders about if you had the chance?

There are two events coming up, at the end of March/beginning of April, that are aimed at advocacy in the disability and Ds community and meeting with Congressional leaders on The Hill.  The first is the 2017 DISABILITY POLICY SEMINAR (DPS), a 4-day event (March19-22) hosted by: American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (aaidd), The Arc, Association of University Centers on Disabilities  (AUCD), National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities (NACDD), Self Advocates Becoming Empowered, and United Cerebral Palsy.  The second, is the annual Buddy Walk on Washington (BWW) (April 4-5) hosted by the National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS). Continue reading What would you talk to your Congressional leaders about if you had the chance?